Raoul Larche
Chandelier

Chandelier
Raoul Larche (1860-1912)
Chandelier
Circa 1900
Gilt bronze and alabaster
H. 60; D. 55.5 cm
© Musée d'Orsay, dist. RMN-Grand Palais / Patrice Schmidt


Chandelier
Chandelier
Chandelier
Chandelier
Chandelier
Chandelier
Chandelier
Chandelier

Lustre [Chandelier]


After rather traditional beginnings, Raoul Larche became the quintessential Art Nouveau sculptor through the evocative power of one of his many works: the 1901 lamp inspired by the dancer Loïe Fuller (three different models).
He designed many objets d'art: epergnes, inkwells, ornamental bowls, which were very successful because of their great facility. Indeed, Larche's genius never seems constrained, and his motifs and female figures seem to flow with consummate ease. In a way, he forms a transition between academic art and the more daring, unbridled imagination of Art Nouveau.

Larche took a particular interest in home light fittings and he supplied the firm of Siot-Décauville with several designs for lamps: Flash with one bulb, Ears of Wheat with four. This chandelier, a highly original piece both for its size and its composition, should be put in this context.
As if they were flying to the clouds, two gleeful butterfly-children form the central stem. The flattened globe of the chandelier carved from a large piece of alabaster hangs below the whirlpool from which the figures are rising.
Light fittings designed by contemporary artists such as Paul Brindeau de Jarny or Emile Robert make the formal and technical audaciousness demonstrated by Raoul Larche in this swirling, sensual chandelier all the more amazing.




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