Lovis Corinth (1858-1925)
Between Impressionism and Expressionism

ARCHIVE
2008

1

2

3

4

painting
Lovis CorinthSelf-portrait with a glass© Photo National Gallery in Prague, 2007

The Secession

The Berlin Secession was founded in 1898. Max Liebermann was its first president, and Walter Leistikow a key figure who persuaded Max Slevogt and Lovis Corinth to join the group. Between 1899 and 1911, the Berlin Secession became a major focus of artistic life in Germany. In 1904, Paul Cassirer invented the expression "triumvirate of German Impressionism" for Liebermann, Slevogt and Corinth, thus underlining the similarities in their work, with French Impressionism.


Classical images distorted and scenes from daily life

Corinth repeatedly turned to themes of love, sexuality and death, taking inspiration from the classical subjects of Greek mythology, the Christian religion and the literary world. His uninhibited, distinct brushstrokes were initially inspired by Frans Hals and Rembrandt


painting
Lovis CorinthOn the beach at Forte dei Marmi© Kunstforum Ostdeutsche Galerie Regensburg
Corinth repeatedly turned to themes of love, sexuality and death, taking inspiration from the classical subjects of Greek mythology, the Christian religion and the literary world. His uninhibited, distinct brushstrokes were initially inspired by Frans Hals and Rembrandt. Corinth always painted from a life model, mostly chosen from those around him. His subjects, often portrayed with exaggerated gestures or grimaces, celebrate nudity without any of the putative grace of biblical or mythological figures. This parody of tradition reveals a satirical element that owes much to Arnold Bocklin, and that would later find an echo in the work of George Grosz and Otto Dix.

Later, having abandoned the hierarchy of genres, Corinth decided to look at scenes of daily life at the time, notably in Bowling Alley, Distributing Christmas presents (1913) and On the beach at Forte dei Marmi (1914).

1

2

3

4


Enlarge font size Reduce font size Tip a friend Print
Facebook
Google+DailymotionYouTubeTwitter