Musée d'Orsay: Hippolyte Marie Pigault Parisian building, project

Hippolyte Marie Pigault
Parisian building, project

Projet pour un immeuble parisien, probablement le 109 rue de Turenne
Hippolyte-Marie Pigault (1827-?)
Projet pour un immeuble parisien, probablement le 109 rue de Turenne
Entre 1876 et 1880
Crayon, encre de Chine et aquarelle
H. 59 ; L. 77,5 cm
© RMN-Grand Palais (Musée d'Orsay) / Tony Querrec

Apartment Building, 109 rue de Turenne and rue des Filles-du-Calvaire


Toward the end of the 1860s, the architect Hippolyte Marie Pigault conceived this large building to occupy a plot of land at the intersection of Rues de Turenne, de Bretagne, and des Filles-du-Calvaire, close to the location where he had just installed his architectural practice.

He adopted the broad principles of Haussmannian Paris, which remained in force in the capital at the start of the Third Republic: strict alignment, the use of stone, uniform elevations, horizontal façades underscored by balconies, decoration reduced to structural details (consoles and bays).

This drawing shows the monumental effect of perspective that such a mode of construction could create. Made particularly picturesque by the inclusion of human figures, this view is remarkable for the time: architects usually produced more modest representations of Haussmannian rental buildings, a common and controlled form that left little room for initiative.

Its architecture almost banal, the Haussmannian rental building is now one of the defining elements of the capital's architectural identity, and a contributor to its very classical urban harmony.




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